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Is Sports Massage Painful?

sports massage   It’s the million dollar question if I got paid every time someone asked me “is sports massage painful?” I’d be very rich indeed. So is sports massage painful? How long is a piece of string? The answer is It can be, it doesn’t have to be and sometimes it’s unavoidable.

How to reduce knee pain when running

I recently posted about 3 approaches that are commonly used to reduce knee pain that don’t work, at least in the long term. But what can you do to reduce knee pain when running? The first step with any injury/pain is to reduce the amount of the activity that brings it on. In the case of acute injuries, tears, and sprains, this is pretty obvious and initially, this will likely be that the activity is reduced to zero. This won’t be zero activity just zero in terms of anything that is likely to stress the knee and surrounding structures whilst you go through rehab. As things improve it is ok to have knee pain when running so long as it isn't a lot. More on that later. What about more chronic pain or one that has come on slowly? Things like ITB syndrome, runners knee, PFP or similar problems. The first port of call is to reduce the activity, in this case running, to the point where there is no knee pain. To begin with this might still be zero but only for a very short period of time and only in the most severe cases. Outside of these, we need to find the combination of duration and intensity that can be done regularly that doesn’t make things worse.  

Up until quite recently I was convinced I simply just couldn't lose weight. I tried and it worked for a little while then nothing. Counting calories was a pain so I tried other ways but the same results each time.

Couldn't be bothered was more the reason than it not working for me. I couldn't find the motivation until I asked the right questions of myself.

Questions are incredibly powerful when we get them correct.

Training Lessons From Kenny Rodgers

I have to say I have a bit of a soft spot for Kenny Rodgers "The Gambler" it's a bit corny but reminds me of hearing it on the radio growing up.

Twice this last week in my training, I have had to fold them, both occasions on a run. One I wasn't too bothered about the other was a little disconcerting.

Last Friday I was doing my second run of the week which includes two blocks at 10k tempo pace. This week the goal was 2 blocks of 10 minutes. All was going well until minute 9 of the second block when I could feel my form significantly deteriorate so I stopped.

Pain is a strange beast

Pain is a strange beast with so many different things affecting how you perceive it. It is, therefore, no surprise that most do not realise that it is primarily simply a warning that something might have happened. Yes, pain doesn't tell you that you have injured your self only that you might have! How can this be I hear you ask? Like many things, it's all about context. There are conversations I have with friends that would be entirely inappropriate to have with others. This is because the shared, 40+ years in some cases, history isn't there. They know I'm joking etc when it at first glance doesn't sound like I am etc. Pain is very like this. How you perceive it is based a lot on your own individual history. All your experiences, both in relation to painful events, both emotional and physical, illness and general social support, what you do for a living and more go into how you perceive pain.

What are the best cardio workouts for the over 40's?

A better question would be...what is the best way to structure a conditioning program for the over 40's? Which would then prompt the reply, what are your goals? Your goals ultimately determine what your conditioning program needs to look like. If you play 5-a-side football regularly then your program will look different to someone who wants to run 5k fast. They, in turn, will look different to someone who takes part in BJJ. What they all have in common is that they are based on a strong aerobic base and less volume than you did in your 20's. stair run

DOMS - what is it?

DOMS or delayed onset muscle soreness is something that everyone has experienced regardless of training history. You don't even have to have trained to experience it. You have just decorated the bedroom and you have sore shoulders, that soreness is DOMS. Often thought of as a sign of a good training session, nothing could be further from the truth. In tech speak the pain is caused by an increase in the acute loading that is sufficiently above your chronic loading level that you aren't ready for. You react to this in an adverse manner that is painful.  The unwanted pain of DOMS is a secondary reason why you should build up the volume and intensity over a period of weeks. The primary reason for the gradual build-up is to reduce the risk of injury. DOMS is painful but it isn't an injury. A good rule of thumb is to use increases of no greater than 10% per week.