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I came across a great article by Greg Nuckols about using perfect form, The myth of perfect form. and what it might be. It's a great piece on why the perfect form that is often talked about really doesn't exist as it is generally described. He uses the back squat as an example and talks about how chasing the mythical dream of squatting like an elite  weightlifter might not be either desirable or even attainable. So lets look at how it might apply to other activities.

I came across this posted on Facebook which I thought was quite interesting. The post talks about how time spent playing is perhaps more important to a child's brain development than time in the classroom. This is not to say that children shouldn't be spending time learning to read and write but that there are great benefits to having young children playing as part of the learning process. A benefit of this would be that the children are encouraged to exercise more in an informal way as the playing of games etc will see them running around. Encouraging the children to play more also helps with performance in the classroom as I noted in this post.

A few weeks ago I mentioned Ryan DeBell at The Movement Fix putting together a simple set of movements/exercises to help you prepare for the day ahead. Taking nothing away from the ideas that Ryan put on the video but perhaps building on  them we can, in some ways, simplify things further. Rather than looking at a set of different movement drills we can look at the simple act of getting up and down off the floor and the different aspects of it. As it provides a rich variety of movements getting up off the floor, and back down, provides great stimulation to the brain and how it is involved in helping us move well.