The Hinge and your golf swing

The hinge movement I’m referring to is that of hip flexion and the movement should occur without any movement in the spine whether at the lumbar, thoracic or cervical areas. So when we hinge the torso should be fixed and all the movement should occur at the hips. In the picture below Adam Scott has gone from a more flexed position through the lumbar and thoracic area with an extended cervical position to having a more neutral position. Continue reading “The Hinge and your golf swing”

Managing injuries

First and foremost when trying to manage an injury we need to find out what it is. Whether you’re a runner, golfer, footballer, rugby player or any other sport there is generally plenty of advice and suggestions online on how to treat the symptoms that you have. This can be helpful in allowing you to function until you get treatment and perhaps continue to train but unless you’re very lucky the chances of your self diagnosis being correct are slim. This is where coming to see us at Performance Sports Therapy fits into your return to activity as our job is to help identify what the injury is and, perhaps more importantly, what caused it.  Continue reading “Managing injuries”

Maintenance tool kit

I’ve been talking about the importance of good posture recently and figured discussing the tools that might be worth investing in in order to help maintain it. The maintenance of good posture comes down to having our skeletal structure correctly aligned. For this to happen our soft tissues must be balanced so that we aren’t getting any asymmetrical pulling from any one structure or number of different ones, think about the effects of sitting and how it affects the front and back of our bodies differently. Once we have balance in terms of the “pull” between opposing areas we need to have the strength to maintain this good position. So my list would include, though not be limited to: Continue reading “Maintenance tool kit”

Injury proofing with better mobility

There are quite a few very good reasons for looking to maintain or improve your joint mobility one is  having a good range of movement through all your joints will protect you from injury. Why so you may ask? Well, within reason, if you have joints that can operate through a full range of their normal un-injured or affected by years of neglect movement you can safely exert force through a much greater range of movement. This ability to exert force through a greater range of movement ultimately means you are less likely to injure yourself. The second is that that if you don’t use it you’ll lose it. Continue reading “Injury proofing with better mobility”

A week in exercise

I’ve said before that i think that one of the biggest contributing factors to the problems I see in many of my clients is a lack of strength, and I’m not talking about being a competitor in the World’s Strongest Man. If this is a lack of overall body strength rather than a specific area it is often combined a lack of general fitness and sometimes in both cases with poor ranges of movement in one or more joints. A lack of a reasonable degree of strength and general fitness makes it difficult to maintain good posture and carry out routine jobs, it will mean you tire more quickly and not just whilst doing physical tasks whilst poor range of movement in any joint will result in compensatory movement patterns that will then put strain on other areas. One of the primary goals of any athlete’s strength and conditioning program is injury prevention; a stronger, fitter athlete will be more injury resistant. This applies to everybody. One of the main reasons for getting fit is to make you more injury resistant and make routine tasks easier. I therefore thought it might be interesting to lay out what I do on a weekly basis. Continue reading “A week in exercise”

It’s January and time to get to the gym but…..

I came across this on Dan Hubbards blog and it’s a very timely piece of advice given that many are heading to the gym on the back of a new years resolution to get fit. If you’ve not been to the gym for a while or are going for the first time remember and take your time before you try and push things. You need to take the time to learn/re-learn the movements you’re doing before you start working them hard inorder to reduce the chance of injuring yourself. In the post Dan highlights a real example of what happened to one of his clients, training elsewhere, when this didn’t happen.

More glutes

A client recently paid for an appointment for their sister who asked “will he do my glutes?”. Anybody who’s read the blog or been in for an appointment regarding back pain knows I think they need a bit of attention, both in terms of bodywork and with prehab/rehab exercise. Here’s a good one my friend Chris let me know about from Zach Dechant’s blog.

Superdog

Getting your 5-a-day

We all know the importance of getting our 5 portions of fruit and veg every day well this is my take  on the idea applied to some simple mobility/flexibilty work that we would all benefit form on a daily basis. Most people now have sedentary jobs and find themselves being in front of a computer either all day or a substantial part of  it. The effects of this sedentary lifestyle on the body are often create a more kyphotic posture, flattening the lumbar curve and exaggerating both the thoracic and cervical curves. The musculature of the back, as a generalisation, gets lengthened whilst that on the front gets shortened and the joints of the spine start to stiffen and lose their mobilty. Along with this the hips also stiffen and the glutes get over stretched and switch off. The hamstrings shorten and the quads lengthen and so on it goes through the body. Continue reading “Getting your 5-a-day”

Helping yourself

One of the questions I ask when somebody new comes in is are they involved in any sports or what exercise do they do(if any). The reason behind the question is to get some insight into where there problems may be coming from and to give advice as to what they can do to help combat any problems that could develop. Of those who either participate in a sport or do regular exercise unless they actually engaging in a sport very few people do any weight training. Pilates, running, yoga, swimming etc but rarely weight training. Continue reading “Helping yourself”