Sports Massage Therapy

It's a busy month in Edinburgh during August with The Edinburgh International Festival, the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo and the Book Festival going on and its been no exception in the clinic. This August we've had quite a number of the performers from the Fringe and the Tattoo along with touring cricketers.

It may be a bit redundant to say it but the abdominals are quite important to how we move but there you go they are. They allow for transference of force from the lower to upper body and vice versa so weak abdominal and lumbar muscles can reduce athletic performance and pain from simply carrying out normal daily activities. They keep the torso stable, try squatting with a heavy weight if you have weak abdominals or lumbar musculature and you will fold over as you try to rise out of the bottom position.

There are quite a few very good reasons for looking to maintain or improve your joint mobility one is  having a good range of movement through all your joints will protect you from injury. Why so you may ask? Well, within reason, if you have joints that can operate through a full range of their normal un-injured or affected by years of neglect movement you can safely exert force through a much greater range of movement. This ability to exert force through a greater range of movement ultimately means you are less likely to injure yourself. The second is that that if you don’t use it you’ll lose it.

IT band pain is a common complaint amongst runners and the causes of it often appear to be mysterious but are they really?  The IT band runs down the side of the leg from the iliac crest to the lateral aspect of the tibial plateau on the tibial tubercle. It originates from the fibres of the Gluteal fascia, and the Tensor Fascia Lata and ending where it blends into the fascia of the lower leg around the peroneals and tibialis anterior.

I had been experiencing pain in around both knees recently and it reminded me of a couple of articles by Art Riggs on knee pain and various aspects that need to be taken into consideration when treating it. Knee pain can come in many forms from meniscal damage to condromalacia but often overlooked are simple muscular/fascial problems in the clamour for something "exciting" to be the problem. When we do get injured or suffer from any of the number of knee conditions that can affect the movement of the knee the condition/injury is often our main concern but we forget that these problems all result in the knee not functioning properly. We develop compensatory movement  patterns due to the pain that affects the knee from the condition/injury or the surgery carried out to repair the damaged area. Sendentary individuals can develop similar problems due to the fact that the knee is flexed for long periods of the day reuslting in the inability to fully extend the knee.

At the weekend I completed the CORE Myofascial Therapy certification program. The class was run by George Kousaleos, the founder of the CORE Institute in Tallahasse, Fl, and ran for 6 pretty intense days. While quite "full on" it was a lot of fun and a great learning experience with the course covering; Myofascial Spreading, Arthrokinetics, CORE Foot Specific work, CORE Release, CORE Back Specific and End work.