Excercise tips

I think we can all agree sleep is pretty important. I have to say I’m not the best sleeper in the world. It’s not unusual for me to wake up several times during the night and to be awake for a while at some point. It’s not been helped over, I was going to write the last few months but it’s actually been about a year with Andrew getting up during the night. Normally only the once but can be twice during the night followed by him coming through about 5 am. He doesn’t take any time to settle back down but it is a total pain when it happens.

Golf and back pain don't quite go together like bread and jam but back pain in golfers is common. One of the biggest reasons for back pain in golfers is an inability to generate sufficient force into the ground. In fact, it’s not just the ability to create this force but to maintain it through the swing that is the big factor. Golf is a sport of extremes in terms of movement. There isn’t really another sport that requires you to maximise your rotation in the manner golf does. Any kinks or flaws will reduce your ability to rotate.

General aches and pains are part and parcel of life but they come and go. It would be unrealistic to expect to be able to avoid them if we are honest given the many different ways that they can come about. From getting so busy at work that getting sufficient rest is an issue to stumbling whilst running for the bus. These tend to come and go. Work calms down, you get more rest and don’t notice the minor niggles anymore. When they do persist what can be done about it?

What are the best cardio workouts for the over 40's?

A better question would be...what is the best way to structure a conditioning program for the over 40's? Which would then prompt the reply, what are your goals? Your goals ultimately determine what your conditioning program needs to look like. If you play 5-a-side football regularly then your program will look different to someone who wants to run 5k fast. They, in turn, will look different to someone who takes part in BJJ. What they all have in common is that they are based on a strong aerobic base and less volume than you did in your 20's. stair run

Foam rolling went through a phase a few years ago where it seemed to be essential in any warm up. It has now fallen out of favour and isn't seen as essential to a warm-up anymore. Foam rolling was never essential to any warm-up but I still think there can be a use for it. I find it useful when used at home if feeling stiff/sore and it makes it easier to ease into larger ranges of movement. My preference is still not to do any foam rolling in a warm-up. This is based primarily because there often isn't a foam roller about or there isn't the room. foam rolling

Training equals rehab, rehab equals training is a phrase that was coined by the American physio Charlie Weingroff. For me, the phrase means that rehab and training do not stand separately from one another. They are a continuum that blends seamlessly together. Parts of the rehab process sit at one end of the spectrum and parts of standard training are at the other the rest sits in the middle being neither one nor the other. Properly progressed rehab should resemble basic strength training and properly performed strength training has an injury preventative aspect.

Marathon preparation is a lengthy one and it is worth spending some time planning it. If you have just finished one or a half marathon and thinking about your next challenge. It may be stepping up to the marathon or looking at setting a PB in the next marathon. Whatever challenge the next race is it's worth setting some goals and formulating a training plan. It's estimated that for those tackling the marathon around 90%, yes you read that correctly 90%, will pick up some sort of injury. This is simply down to the training being tough. You need to get used to spending a lot of time on your feet and it gets to the stage where a short run is 5 or 6 miles. Not all of these injuries will be significant in terms of lost training time but it still highlights how demanding the training is.

Achilles tendinopathy is one of the more common running injuries and I mentioned it previously in post TOP 5 RUNNING INJURIES. As I mentioned there it is pretty much an overuse injury that can be avoided, for the most part though not always, by good programming. If you gradually increase your training load it is possible to avoid overuse injuries as you are training within your capacity to recover before the next training session. In doing this once you get to the tough part of the program the hard training in itself has a protective mechanism, as described by Tim Gabbett here. running up hill

Back pain is often spoken about in structural and biomechanical manner where you can get the impression that you may have to give up doing what you love to do be it golf, crossfit, rugby or gardening because you have issue X. The big issue with this is that it on the one hand over simplifies the problem and catastrophises it all in one go so that you are left thinking that your wonky leg is the cause of all your pain and trying to run on it is a recipe for disaster.