Deep Tissue Massage

Is Sports Massage Painful?

sports massage   It’s the million dollar question if I got paid every time someone asked me “is sports massage painful?” I’d be very rich indeed. So is sports massage painful? How long is a piece of string? The answer is It can be, it doesn’t have to be and sometimes it’s unavoidable.

How to reduce knee pain when running

I recently posted about 3 approaches that are commonly used to reduce knee pain that don’t work, at least in the long term. But what can you do to reduce knee pain when running? The first step with any injury/pain is to reduce the amount of the activity that brings it on. In the case of acute injuries, tears, and sprains, this is pretty obvious and initially, this will likely be that the activity is reduced to zero. This won’t be zero activity just zero in terms of anything that is likely to stress the knee and surrounding structures whilst you go through rehab. As things improve it is ok to have knee pain when running so long as it isn't a lot. More on that later. What about more chronic pain or one that has come on slowly? Things like ITB syndrome, runners knee, PFP or similar problems. The first port of call is to reduce the activity, in this case running, to the point where there is no knee pain. To begin with this might still be zero but only for a very short period of time and only in the most severe cases. Outside of these, we need to find the combination of duration and intensity that can be done regularly that doesn’t make things worse.  

Training Lessons From Kenny Rodgers

I have to say I have a bit of a soft spot for Kenny Rodgers "The Gambler" it's a bit corny but reminds me of hearing it on the radio growing up.

Twice this last week in my training, I have had to fold them, both occasions on a run. One I wasn't too bothered about the other was a little disconcerting.

Last Friday I was doing my second run of the week which includes two blocks at 10k tempo pace. This week the goal was 2 blocks of 10 minutes. All was going well until minute 9 of the second block when I could feel my form significantly deteriorate so I stopped.

Pain is a strange beast

Pain is a strange beast with so many different things affecting how you perceive it. It is, therefore, no surprise that most do not realise that it is primarily simply a warning that something might have happened. Yes, pain doesn't tell you that you have injured your self only that you might have! How can this be I hear you ask? Like many things, it's all about context. There are conversations I have with friends that would be entirely inappropriate to have with others. This is because the shared, 40+ years in some cases, history isn't there. They know I'm joking etc when it at first glance doesn't sound like I am etc. Pain is very like this. How you perceive it is based a lot on your own individual history. All your experiences, both in relation to painful events, both emotional and physical, illness and general social support, what you do for a living and more go into how you perceive pain.

I injured myself in mid November last year. Nothing serious just a mild grade 1 tear in vastus lateralis, one of your quads, when doing some heavy squats. I took it easy for a couple of weeks and gradually worked back into things. I then tore it again in the first week in January! To say I was not happy would be an understatement.   man squatting

What went wrong?

Are you missing ankle mobility? Having sufficient range of movement in your ankle is important. If you want to run fast or jump high having good ankle range of movement in dorsiflexion is essential. This is not just in the sporting environment but simply to walk well we need good ankle mobility. The movement that important is the ability to pull your toes towards you. A lack of dorsiflexion is linked with increased injury risk with achilles tendinopathy and patella tendinopathy having been shown to be impacted by a lack of ankle mobility in dorsiflexion.

The first step in any injury assessment is what previous injuries do you have. The biggest predictor of future injury lies in your injury history. As a result looking into your injury history will play an important roll in deciding on what needs to be done. If you have previously injured your ankle, knee or hip these are areas we need to investigate in the injury assessment. We do this becasue of the scale of the impact they have on the way you move. Two of the more important things that we are looking out for in the clinic are asymmetries and pain.When we are assessing movement we are looking to see both how good it is and does it cause pain.