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We take about 20,000 breaths a day so breathing well can help us in a lot of different ways. We see many people in the clinic and a common thread would be an inability to breathe with full, deep, slow and relaxing manner and  yet they never attribute this in any way to why they may be in pain. dreamstime_m_63245498
So what does breathing have to do with knee pain, back pain, shoulder pain or pain in any other area of your body?
First and foremost if you aren't breathing well, lets assume this to be having the ability to take nice slow, deep breaths in and out through the nose, then the chances are you don't totally relax. If you aren't relaxing properly then the chances are you aren't sleeping as well and if you aren't sleeping well you could your recovery ability is impaired. The relates to your ability to recover from your workout, your day at work or an injury.

When we are dealing with ankle injuries in the clinic we follow a basic protocol with them regardless of the injury. This doesn't mean that we treat each one the same but rather that to ensure that each injury is addressed fully we require each individual section to be run through.  In doing this we can ensure that  there is the highest chance of a successful recovery.

So what can be causing lower back pain when you are deadlifting? If you are deadlifting or other pulling movements and you aren't creating enough tension through the body then this can create extra stress in areas that aren't really expecting or ready for it.  When we are doing pulling movements from the floor we need to take the slack out of the upper body by first gripping the bar hard and then by pulling the bar towards us by contracting the lats.

Googling exercises for knee pain isn't really the best way to deal with any problems you may be experiencing as they aren't specific to YOUR problem. Having said this when it comes to looking to prevent getting knee pain the specificity issue becomes less of a problem as we aren't looking to rehab an injury rather we are looking to ensure the areas that impact on the knee are in good condition. Runners knee or anterior knee pain is one of the more common issues that affect runners but adjusting how you warm up can help reduce the chances of it being a problem for you.

Strength training is integral to any well thought out program for an athlete be they a runner, cyclist, footballer or rugby player. The reason for it's inclusion is usually performance related, as in looking for it to aid improved performance through the ability to generate more force etc. There are other benefits to getting stronger and in this paper from the BJSM website it's role as an intervention in sports injuries was examined.

The role of hip mobility comes up regularly in the clinic but how much movement you need depends on what your goals are. If you want to be a gymnast the the  quantity and quality of movement needs to be high but if you have less lofty goals of maintaining good hip health for running then we still want quality movement but the amount we need is significantly less.  Having said this regardless of our goal maintaining a normal range of movement in the hip can help reduce the chances of creating problems in our backs, knees and ankles.