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  There has been something of an ongoing debate online about the benefits of interval training over steady state training when it comes to endurance or cardiovscular training. The perceived wisdom over the last few years pushing things towards the idea that all you need to do is some form of interval training and that steady state low intensity work has no value. As with most things the answer is no where near as clear cut as this and both types of training have their merits and the evidence, as we can see in this excellent paper, rather than the internet chatter, does suggest that both should be part of a well rounded program.

Breathing is something that I work on a lot with clients and try to help them realise how big an impact simply improving how you breathe can have on their energy levels and sense of well being. This is before we consider the impact that poor breathing habits can have with regards to headaches, neck pain and other problems in the upper body.

The term Trigger Points (TrPs) is often used by therapists to describe localised tender spots that may refer pain to other areas when stimulated.  Whilst there seems to be less argument about whether they exist or not there is more about what they might be and there are major issues with being able to find them, perhaps 50/50 at best, and the reproducibility of actually being able to find them, 18%. In fact in 1992 a, admittedly small, blind study was carried out on them using using both those with Myofascial TrP's and fibromyalgia. Yet the best of the best of Trigger Point specialists including Simons, of Travell and Simons writers of the Trigger Point bible, and 3 others couldn't find or agree on any  where they were given as much time as required to find them. For myself they were never a good fit in any treatment I was trying to carry out as the treatment of them seemed to be the polar opposite of what I was trying to do otherwise, that is relieve pain not cause more pain. The treatment of TrP's for most manual therapists seems to revolve around pressing hard on something that is already sore and use the symptoms to help understand what the underlying problem may be and treat that not the symptoms, I've always felt that they were symptoms of an issue elsewhere rather than a problem in and of themselves. There is certainly more evidence to suggest that TrP's  may be a sensitization of the nervous system, possibly centrally. This carries even more weight when you consider that the areas that the referred pain cover are very similar to the path of the peripheral nerves. There is a great short piece over at the HumanAntiGravitySuit giving a couple of lovely diagrams of how the idea of TrP's may be more about nerves.

The hinge movement I'm referring to is that of hip flexion and the movement should occur without any movement in the spine whether at the lumbar, thoracic or cervical areas. So when we hinge the torso should be fixed and all the movement should occur at the hips. In the picture below Adam Scott has gone from a more flexed position through the lumbar and thoracic area with an extended cervical position to having a more neutral position.

First and foremost when trying to manage an injury we need to find out what it is. Whether you're a runner, golfer, footballer, rugby player or any other sport there is generally plenty of advice and suggestions online on how to treat the symptoms that you have. This can be helpful in allowing you to function until you get treatment and perhaps continue to train but unless you're very lucky the chances of your self diagnosis being correct are slim. This is where coming to see us at Performance Sports Therapy fits into your return to activity as our job is to help identify what the injury is and, perhaps more importantly, what caused it.